Márton Gyöngyösi

 

Non-attached Member of the European Parliament

Executive Vice-President of Jobbik

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Dear Friends, 

Allow me to proudly present my website where you can read the latest information on my activities as the member of the European Parliament and as the Executive Vice-President of Jobbik. Three decades have passed since Hungary stepped on the path of European integration. Back then we were dreaming about becoming a member of a successful community resting on solid foundations. However, our continent is now nearly torn apart by conflicting interests.

Today’s European Union is characterized by crises while Hungary echoes with the ideological disputes of the past. What we aim for Europe is to once again become a fair continent that shows solidarity and respects its Christian values the way it was envisioned by the founding fathers of European integration. As for Hungary, we want it to become a free, democratic and competitive country, just as we wished for at the time when Communism collapsed. Come with us!

Best regards,

Márton Gyöngyösi MEP

 

Publications

Yet another political move the world did not need: the reversion of Hagia Sophia into a mosque

Yet another political move the world did not need: the reversion of Hagia Sophia into a mosque

Looking at the recent political events, you may feel that the cyclical nature of economic ups and downs may just as much be observed in politics as well. When leaders want to cooperate and listen to each other, it is usually followed by some improvement. Of course, such improvements typically require some compromise that everybody remembers for a while. However, when the memories of hard times fade and stability becomes the new norm, more and more people tend to start questioning the world order as they have already forgotten why certain gestures and compromises were made. Times like this bring the rise of politicians who want nothing more than to bask in their own glory, ignoring the needs of others. To gain popularity quickly, these politicians are happy to upset and uproot any norms, written and unwritten rules or social conventions around them. We Hungarians have an in-depth experience with this type of politician: we are treated to Viktor Orbán’s self-indulgence on a daily basis.

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Taking risks and gaining respect – European Parliament fails yet again – The Weekly 15

Taking risks and gaining respect – European Parliament fails yet again – The Weekly 15

The need to choose leaders to organize work activities, command armies, give guidance and help their communities to overcome difficulties is as old as the formation of the earliest human groups. Although leaders are selected in a completely different way now than they were in prehistoric times, the fundamental goals and needs have hardly changed over the millennia.
 
Due to their position, leaders tend to be granted certain powers and privileges but the very point of these privileges is to enable them to remove the obstacles from the way so that they could devote their full attention to the community’s welfare. Abusing these privileges or misusing them for the leaders’ private purposes is one of the most obvious markers of leadership incompetency. Leadership privileges certainly come with a significant amount of risk: leaders have to bear the weight of their decisions and sometimes even take personal risks in order to promote the welfare of the people. Just as ship captains are the last to jump in the lifeboat and police officers need to engage in a gunfight on occasion, politicians must be present in the public sphere and be the last to leave. Leaders who abuse or misuse their rights typically lose the people’s respect and are slowly forgotten or, in some cases, quickly ousted from their positions.

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What should Europe do about a mafia? – The Weekly 14

What should Europe do about a mafia? – The Weekly 14

If there is anything that all Europeans can be proud of regardless of their nationality, origin or identity, it is most certainly the rule of law, transparency, access to legal representation and equality before the law. We can be proud of how our continent has been governed by these principles for centuries and, even if an aggressive regime has occasionally been able to drag its country away from them, we could always find our way back to them eventually. On the other hand, there has always been another system lurking at the frontiers of Europe, ready to spread its untransparent and self-interested laws – let’s call it tribalism, clan mentality or mafia. Weak monarchs or governments have been known to give in to or at least co-exist with the mafia or the oligarchs but strong leaders and strong societies refused to tolerate them.
For a long time, we may have thought that the European Union was such a strong community since we have heard so much about its values and strict but fair laws. We Hungarians had long been hoping to become a member of this alliance because we thought that its norms and regulations would protect us once and for all from the backward forces that have regularly attempted to drive our Central European country to another, Asian road. In short, we thought we would be protected from the political mafia, the oligarchs, the obscure informal networks and the consequent vulnerability, weakness and general social deprivation.

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“for a Better Europe”